Home » World » Cardiac arrest may have contributed to crash that killed man, unborn baby – World news

Cardiac arrest may have contributed to crash that killed man, unborn baby – World news

Cardiac arrest may have contributed to crash that killed man, unborn baby – World news

A man who died in a crash in south Auckland was seen “slumped” over the steering wheel shortly before he collided with another car, causing a pregnant woman to lose her baby.

Colin Bryce Evans, 54, was killed in a car crash on Mill Rd in Alfriston on January 27, 2018, after his car crossed the centre line and hit a Mini Cooper.

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A recently released coroner’s report said Evans died from the combined effects of heart failure and injuries from the crash.

Evans was killed when he crashed into another car on Mill Rd in south Auckland. (File photo)

KEVIN STENT/Stuff

Evans was killed when he crashed into another car on Mill Rd in south Auckland. (File photo)

The woman driving the Mini Cooper, who was 21 weeks’ pregnant, was also injured in the crash and lost her unborn baby as a result.

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Coroner Tania Tetitaha said Evans had several health issues, including heart failure and a seizure disorder which meant he wasn’t allowed to drive for some time in 2012. He had since regained his licence.

On the day of the crash, a witness saw Evans swerving across the road and he appeared slumped over the steering wheel.

The serious crash unit investigated the accident and said they couldn’t rule out driver distraction or a cardiac event being a factor in the crash. They mentioned Evans wasn’t wearing a seatbelt which was a factor in the severity of his injuries.

Tetitaha sought comment from Evans’ GP and Middlemore Hospital about whether he had been assessed as fit to drive before the crash.

Dr Marianne Lund, a cardiologist employed by Counties Manukau District Health Board, provided a report that said he was diagnosed with cardiac failure in 2017 and uncontrolled heart failure in January 2018.

The report said people with recent or uncontrolled heart failure shouldn’t drive, but Lund couldn’t find notes to confirm if Evans had been told this during his hospital stay in January 2018.

“I don’t have evidence to confirm this advice was given. This is, however, standard advice given by the cardiology team for all heart failure admissions,” Lund said.

Evans had been admitted to Middlemore Hospital in the weeks before his death. (File photo)

JARRED WILLIAMSON/Stuff

Evans had been admitted to Middlemore Hospital in the weeks before his death. (File photo)

Evans’ family said he hadn’t been told not to drive during his last hospital stay and at his last GP appointment his fitness to drive wasn’t discussed.

Tetitaha said the evidence showed Evans’ medical team agreed he was unfit to drive, but there was doubt raised by the family that he wasn’t told this. No written advice was given.

“If a medical practitioner assesses a patient as unfit to drive, this should be recorded and a copy of the advice provided to the patient,” Tetitaha said.

She said Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) should consider providing health practitioners with a simple form setting out advice regarding fitness to drive and require them to give written advice to patients and record it in medical records.

She also suggested the Ministry of Transport consider requiring health professionals to notify Waka Kotahi of drivers with long term or permanently disabling medical conditions affecting their fitness to drive.

Waka Kotahi confirmed it had provided a range of templates and forms to health professionals and was reviewing the booklet.

“NZTA is limited in its ability to influence the way health practitioners carry out examinations or maintain health records as these will be dependent on the professional guidelines specific to the health profession,” it said.

”NZTA would be happy to consider what further emphasis could be applied to the current guidance and placement of the information during the review.”

The Ministry of Transport said work was under way to consider reviewing framework related to fitness to drive.

This is original news content created by MELANIE EARLEY on www.stuff.co.nz, Newslogic.in or any author at newslogic.in has no rights over this content. This content is auto fetched from the original post, the link to the original post is given below.

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